Mortality measurement

This theme encompasses macro and micro analyses, and descriptive and causal analyses. Several ongoing research studies fall under this theme: The Human Mortality Database, CenSoc, the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES).  Others are pilot projects of shorter duration.  

Project Director:
William Dow
Description:

This pilot project explores the quality and suitability of available data for studying health and aging in Cuba, in preparation for a potential R-series grant application. The specific hypotheses to be proposed for study in the eventual R-series grant will depend on the nature of available Cuban data, and its comparability with available HRS sister and related studies from other countries. 

Project Director:
William Jagust
Description:

Older adults often face complicated decisions involving financial investment and retirement planning. However, aging is accompanied by profound changes in the neural systems supporting such decisions, which include prefrontal cortex, the mesolimbic dopamine system, and medial temporal lobe memory structures.

Project Director:
Joshua Goldstein
Description:

The goal of this project is to create a large-scale, open-access micro dataset with detailed information on individual level covariates and on mortality. The use of large-scale, administrative datasets to study mortality trends and inequalities has increased in recent years.

Project Director:
Magali Barbieri
Description:

In 2016, CEDA awarded a pilot grant to the Human Mortality Database, to investigate the feasibility of developing an alternative mortality database to host lifetable series for countries where detailed demographic statistics are available but where the quality of the data is not on par with that required for inclusion in the HMD.

Project Director:
Rucker Johnson (Goldman School of Public Policy, UC Berkeley)
Description:

Current health policy debates fixate on rising costs of health care (and how to curb them) without as much attention on the long-term value and productivity of human capital investments, particularly when they are strategically timed (e.g., early childhood access to quality care and quality schools pre-K-12) to shape future health trajectories and augment productive c

Project Director:
Josh Goldstein (Demography, UC Berkeley) and Ryan D. Edwards
Description:

The objectives of this pilot inquiry are to investigate the way in which the first names of the roughly 4,000 self-identified Hispanic individuals in the U.S. Health and Retirement Study (HRS) may contain new information on cultural identity as it pertains to health and the well-known Hispanic Health Paradox (HHP).

Project Director:
Doug Miller (Department of Economics, UC Davis)
Description:

With our pilot grant funding, we were able to hire an RA for several quarters' effort. With this, we were able to push the project forward in several ways.

Project Director:
Michael Anderson (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley)
Description:

The goal of this research is to estimate the impact of long-term exposure to air pollution on mortality. To do this we intend to leverage near-random variation in pollution levels generated by wind patterns near major highways.

Project Director:
Ming Hsu (Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley)
Description:

Real-life decisions, in both individual and social domains, frequently require rapid appraisal and adjustment in the face of uncertainty. The latter can be particularly difficult, owing to the need to understand the incentives and mental models of other intelligent agents.

Project Director:
John R. Wilmoth (Department of Demography, UC Berkeley)
Description:

This pilot project explores the possibility of developing rigorously tested mortality estimates for many Third World populations, including in some of the poorest countries in the world in sub-Saharan Africa, using existing data from Demographic Surveillance Sites (DSS) for subpopulations in these countries.

Project Director:
John R. Wilmoth (Department of Demography, UC Berkeley)
Description:

The Human Mortality Database has greatly facilitated mortality research by providing very high quality national mortality data on the web, data which meet a high standard of accuracy at older ages.

Project Director:
Claude Fischer (Sociology, UC Berkeley)
Description:

Given the acknowledged importance of personal social networks to the health of people generally, but to older people in particular, it is important to know how those networks change as people move into the older stages of life, including transiting to empty nest, retirement, and widowhood. Little seems to be securely understood now.